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Archive for the ‘Camping’ Category


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“Trout, Trout, Trout!”

Fly Fishing Trip: How serious are you about fishing? How about a 30-mile hike before you ever wet a line? Sometimes you have to find the end-of-the trail before you start enjoying some of the worlds best trout fishing. (Can you find the Golden trout)?

Somewhere, WY

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“Fall Spender!”

Today‘s Featured Canoe Trip (Crow River, North Fork): Unseasonably weather brought 80-degree temperatures on this fall canoe trip. Friday we ventured to Lake Maria and boiled up Crayfish with Mussels, while roughing it with some homemade brew. Saturday was a tummy-buster with Pot Roast, carrots and potatoes. The half-mile trek to our campsite kept us in shape for dessert — Homemade Apple Crisp!

Crow River, MN

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“A Picture Perfect Day!”

Today‘s Featured Canoe Trip (Crow River, North Fork): A one-hour drive west of the Twin Cities puts you in your canoe and paddling one of Minnesota’s best rivers. This narrow river, with a procession of large oaks and maples trees along it’s banks, challenges paddlers attention. Dead-fall and low hanging branches are around every corner — making manoeuvring this river a fun attraction in low water months.

Crow River, MN

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“Be Organized and Plan for the Unexpected!”

Today‘s Featured Canoe Trip (BWCA): This was my third trip into Minnesota’s largest untouched ecosystem, the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. With my guiding hat on — seven hardy paddlers from Eden Prairie, Minnesota’s Outdoor Center, set out to explore and experience this large majestic forest. Along our trek we found many kinds of mushrooms, moss and granite protrusions.
Preparing for any trip outdoors requires planning and preparation. Knowing that conditions can — and most often WILL change require you to respond and act appropriately when conditions turn unpleasant. On the fourth day, we had rain, lightning and hail. By having a shelter, such as a lean-to tarp or canopy, everyone was able to enjoy a hot meal.

Brule Lake, MN

 

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A Star-of-a-buck in Starbuck, Minnesota.

Whether it’s “First blood gets the deer” or “The person who makes the killing shot?” In either case, it’s not an easy answer.

My friend hunts private property near Starbuck, MN. He usually hunts a fence line dividing two fields. On this day, the neighbors were hunting close by, so he decided to hunt the adjacent woods. From his stand he heard a shot and watched as the neighbors drag a doe to their vehicle. While watching the hunters, a massive buck moving slowly, through tall switchgrass, caught his eye! The deer was between my friend and the other hunters. As the deer moved passed the other hunters, a safe shot presented itself. He took the shot and the deer dropped! You can imagine how excited he was! He yelled from his stand, “I have a big buck down!” The other hunters walk in his direction as my friend climbed down from his stand. The hunters and my friend walked towards the deer from opposite sides — at 30-yards the deer gets up and starts to run. A hunter from the other party shoots and hits the spine — killing the deer.

The Loaded Question?
Later inspection, my friend had hit the deer in the hind quarter. It was a deer of a lifetime! A huge 11-point buck worthy of a wall mount!

As everyone stood around the deer, the question came up, “So who’s deer is it anyways?” The hunter who shot the second time felt it was his deer. My friend feels that if he had not called the others over — that he would have had a second shot.  In the end, my friend decided it wasn’t worth arguing over and walked away the better man.

So what do you think? Please share your thoughts.

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Come visit Twin Cities Outdoor Adventures Group (TCOA) new site. It’s the best way to connect with other outdoor enthusiasts!

Located in the heart of the Twin Cities Metro area, TCOA consists of a growing number of outdoor enthusiasts who thrive on sharing new experiences, while building camaraderie with others who also appreciate the great outdoors.

Get Off the Couch

If it’s exercise you’re after…come breath in the fresh, clean air and feel rejuvenated. Join us in planning fun-filled activities such as hiking, biking, camping and many other exhilarating outdoor pleasures.

Outdoor Learning Activities

If you’re interested in knowing more about the outdoors…growing TCOA connections in the community have led to a plethora of learning opportunities, including how-to camping seminars, wildlife identification field trips, local geocaching events and more.

The Right Gear

Having the proper equipment is essential to every safe, successful outdoor experience. If you’re a little low in the outdoor gear department, don’t worry. TCOA’s 1000-plus membership allows us to pool our efforts, so participants have access to the appropriate equipment for their event. Additionally, local sponsors offer informative seminars highlighting equipment, tips and techniques to further ensure that our outings proceed as planned.

Community-Grown Success Starts with our Members
As the foundation of our growth and success, TCOA members are committed individuals who generously share knowledge, volunteer and help plan outdoor activities while engaging others to do the same.

Join us in pursuing our mutual passion for the outdoors! FREE! Join TODAY!

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The week before Halloween my friends and I usually travel to Ontario, Canada, near the Northwest Angle. We would hunt deer on the many islands located on Lake of the Woods.

There was one year we got stuck 30-miles out when a storm blew in like the one this week. With 50-mile sustainable winds, we had 4 to 6 foot waves as we fought our way back to deer camp! We took two boats, a 17-foot Alumacraft and a Bayliner runabout. I was driving the Alumacraft, while wave-after-wave would crash over the bow; only to land on the motor behind me.

We pulled ashore twice to start a fire and wait for the wind to subside. The squalls would raise the lake to our face — drenching our souls and leaving a chill I still feel today!

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